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Community Project Funding

Constituent Services

Community Project Funding

I am continuing my service on the U.S. House Appropriations Committee, responsible for directing over $1.5 trillion of annual federal discretionary spending throughout our country. Our Committee’s responsibilities reach all federal government efforts, including agriculture, defense, veterans, science, energy, environment, justice, homeland security, labor, health and human services, education, transportation, housing and foreign affairs.

Appropriations is currently preparing our Fiscal Year 2023 (October 1, 2022-September 30, 2023) appropriations bills. Last year, the House adopted a submissions process for Community Project Funding (CPF) requests by individual Members for specific projects and purposes. This is because Members know our districts and their unique needs and priorities, and should be able to direct some federal funding to specific projects rather than leave those decisions to federal administrators without that knowledge. 

A similar procedure in prior years was known commonly as “earmarking”. Although it was mostly applied fairly and correctly (we have many examples of critical projects in Hawai’i that would not have been completed without directed funding from our Congressional delegation), it was abused and rightly suspended. 

CPF is subject to strict limitations to avoid similar abuse. CPF requests may only be directed to governments or non-profits, not for-profit businesses or individuals. They must have demonstrated community support, and are subject to audit by the independent Government Accountability Office. They are limited in number, and the total amount of all approved CPFs for all Members cannot exceed 1% of all appropriations for the year. Finally, all Members must publicly disclose their CPF requests together with required information on each request. More information on CPFs and restrictions on abuse is here.  

In preparing my own CPF requests, I consulted with Hawai’i state and county governments and non-profits, applied my own knowledge and beliefs as to district needs, considered whether a project could obtain federal funding through other means, and made some difficult decisions given my limited number of CPF requests. There is no assurance that any or all of my CPF requests will be approved in the amounts requested or at all.

Please view my CPF Constituent Guide for more information on this process.


Fiscal Year 2023

ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT

Hawai‘i State Energy Office Clean Energy Wayfinders

  • Project Recipient: Hawai‘i State Energy Office
  • Recipient Address: 235 S Beretania St #502, Honolulu, HI 96813
  • Amount Requested: $1,000,000
  • Project Description: The Hawai‘i State Energy Office launched the Clean Energy Wayfinders program in early 2022. Its mission is to advance Hawai‘i’s clean energy goals and foster new employment opportunities while addressing inequities in vulnerable communities. Wayfinders serve a one-year term working with host community organizations to share information, provide resource referrals, and facilitate community input on clean energy and energy efficiency policy, programs, and project development. These services help empower community residents to get involved in Hawai‘i’s clean energy transition through improved access to energy efficiency, conservation, and renewable resources; improving access to clean transportation; and, amplifying community voices with policymakers and clean energy project developers for more effective and constructive decision-making throughout the development process. The initial cohort of eight Wayfinders serve all counties (one on Kaua‘i, Maui, Moloka‘i; three on O‘ahu, two on Hawai‘i island) following an intense six-week and ongoing clean energy and community engagement training session to prepare them to be trusted resources. Wayfinders serve in low-to-moderate income (LMI), asset limited, income constrained, employed (ALICE), or under-resourced communities with existing or planned renewable energy projects. The close coordination and collaboration with stakeholders ensure that Wayfinders help co-create and implement unique local strategies that enhance and uplift community engagement without duplicating or interfering with other project- or policy-specific programs and activities. Last cohort was funded in partnership with the Kupu ‘Āina Corps. Funding is scalable to include more communities. The $1 million will establish a firm foundation to maintain and grow the program to multiple communities on each island so that others in Hawai‘i have the means to equitably participate in and benefit from our state’s transition to a clean energy and carbon-free economy.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: The Clean Energy Wayfinders program is structured in a way that fully involves, supports, invests in, and gives back to the local community. Participants who are selected to a Wayfinders cohort are local residents of their communities that go right back into working with and for their home communities, with an increased knowledge of how to help and educate the transition to a clean energy and carbon-free economy. Hawaii, as one of six majority-minority states, and the only state that has never had a white majority, is home to a plethora of communities that historically have not had access to clean energy resources or education. Further, as a state that relies on shipping imports to survive, the overwhelming need to become more energy independent is critical; The changes to the shipping supply chains the past few months are proof of the imminent threat to Hawaii’s energy and livelihood should imports ever halt altogether. Having an educated clean energy workforce that is diverse and truly understands the unique pressures and situation of our island state is of the utmost importance in Hawaii’s transition to 100% clean energy by 2045. The money for this project puts Hawai‘i on the pathway to set an example for the rest of the nation in how to achieve renewable and clean energy standards on a large scale, in a way that truly encompasses local constituents and isn’t run by outside large corporations just looking to make profit. This type of applied development and results-driven research is the type of innovation and application that the country needs to support in order to promote clean energy independence and fight pressing issues like climate change.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

HOMELAND SECURITY

Hardening of Fire Station Doors

  • Project Recipient: City and County of Honolulu
  • Recipient Address: 530 S King St, Honolulu, HI 96813
  • Amount Requested: $1,740,550
  • Project Description: This request would direct funding to replace and harden 52 fiberglass doors at 13 HFD fire stations on the Island of Oahu that are at risk of failing during an emergency. The current fiberglass doors at the fire stations were installed between 1968 and 2009 and are, on average, over 43 years old. This funding would provide hurricane-resistant doors to replace the aged fiberglass doors at each of the stations and mitigate future hazards.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: The Honolulu Fire Department (HFD) plays a key role in the City and County of Honolulu’s emergency response efforts during disaster. However, the HFD itself is vulnerable to natural disasters because of the aged fiberglass doors at many of its stations. Should high winds, heavy rain, earthquakes, or other disasters blow through the outdated doors, it could cause significant damage to the station and resources within the station, causing a delay in response to emergency incidents. Additionally, if a particular station becomes inoperable due to a natural disaster, other communities will be affected since HFD resources from other stations will be rerouted to respond to emergencies. This funding will mitigate the severity of catastrophic natural or manmade disasters on the HFD’s response capabilities to preserve the operational response resiliency.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES

Forest Protection for Pearl Harbor Aquifer Recovery

  • Project Recipient: Hawai‘i State Department of Land and Natural Resources
  • Recipient Address: 1151 Punchbowl St, Honolulu Hawai‘i, 96813
  • Environmental Protection Agency – State and Tribal Assistance Grants
  • Amount Requested: $1,720,000
  • Project Description: This funding will allow the Hawai‘i Department of Land and Natural Resources to protect freshwater resources. The Department will expand the acres of invasive plant control to target incipient populations of invasive plants that pose the greatest threat to the health of the native forest in the watersheds that empty into Pearl Harbor and recharge the Pearl Harbor Aquifer. The funding will also enable the construction of new ungulate-proof fencing to provide long-term protection of the forest by enclosing areas with the highest recharge rates.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: The Pearl Harbor Aquifer supplies over 60% of the island of O‘ahu’s drinking water. On November 20, 2021, an estimated 14,000 gallons of fuel leaked into the Pearl Harbor Aquifer from the Navy’s Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility. This catastrophic event, combined with already diminishing water supplies in the Pearl Harbor Aquifer, has created an emergency that requires immediate attention. Protecting and restoring native forests in the Ko‘olau Mountains will help safeguard drinking water supplies and replenish the Pearl Harbor Aquifer. Protection of the upland forests is identified in the Navy’s 2022 Red Hill Shaft Recovery and Monitoring Plan as a necessary action toward recovery of the aquifer and the replenishment of water that supports Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

Bishop Museum Ichthyology Collection

  • Project Recipient: The Bishop Museum
  • Recipient Address: 1525 Bernice Street, Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96817
  • Amount Requested: $250,000
  • Project Description: This funding will be used to relocate the museum’s ichthyology collection which faces critical obstacles. It will also digitize key photographs, rehouse original holotype of the megamouth shark, and fund other key preservation efforts.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: Bishop Museum houses one of the largest collections of coral reef fishes in the world, including the most comprehensive representation of both specimens and color images of fishes from the vast Indo‐Pacific region, including Hawai‘i and other U.S. territories. With the effects of climate change expected to devastate coral reef ecosystems in the coming decades, the importance of this collection – which emphasizes the discovery and documentation of species new to science – continues to increase. . The collection is housed within an aging warehouse building built in the 1970s and designed to last for 10 years, which is suffering severe problems such as a leaking roof and outdated facilities. Collection rooms double as staff offices and specimen preparation areas and are spread across different areas of the collection. To move from one office to another, staff must cross through the collection itself, exposing the specimens to light and other risks. Moreover, the collection has completely filled all the available shelf space and struggles to absorb newly collected material.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

‘Iolani Palace Etched Glass Door Pane Collection

  • Project Recipient: Friends of ‘Iolani Palace
  • Recipient Address: 364 South King Street, Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96813
  • Amount Requested: $60,000
  • Project Description: Funding would allow the Palace to bring in expert historical artisans to preserve the Palace’ unique etched door pane collection. The collection has fallen into disrepair over the years as a result of vandalism and years of weathering. Funding will also allow the originals to be put on display for the general public.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: Iolani Palace is a truly unique national treasure that houses collections we simply cannot allow to fall into disrepair. Designated as a Natural Historic Landmark in 1962, ʻIolani Palace embodies the shared history of the Native Hawaiian people and the United States. As the only royal residence on American soil, the palace served as the seat of government for the Kingdom of Hawai‘i, the following provisional government, the Territory of Hawai‘i and ultimately the State of Hawai‘i until 1969. The Palace’s collections, such as its etched glass door panes, help tell the story of the last days of the Kingdom of Hawai‘i and preserve a vital piece of our nation’s history.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

East to West O‘ahu Active Transit Corridor

  • Project Recipient: City and County of Honolulu Department of Transportation Services
  • Recipient Address: 650 South King Street, Third Floor, Honolulu, Hawai‘i, 96813
  • Amount Requested: $4,800,000
  • Project Description: This project will fund planning and preliminary engineering to design a safe bicycle and pedestrian path connecting communities between Nānākuli and Mānoa, spanning 30 miles. It will identify current infrastructure gaps to link communities long isolated from one another, enabling and encouraging human-powered trips. While bicycle and pedestrian connectivity exists within each community in this corridor, this project aims to provide short, medium, and long-distance regional connectivity for active transportation users as well as recreation for localusers. This effort will inventory federal, state, and county lands and roadways and forge a 30-mile multi-use path connecting the island of Oʻahu's densest neighborhoods along the south shore using a mix of new infrastructure, existing roads, and underutilized historic trails. This planning and design effort will provide preliminary engineering towards construction, which can be completed through collaboration of all involved stakeholders.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: This project will help to enhance complementary, safe and active transportation opportunities within and throughout the Island of O‘ahu. These needs are documented in the city’s Oʻahu Bike Plan and Oʻahu Pedestrian Plan that call for investment in Title VI and environmental justice neighborhoods historically lacking the benefits of active transport infrastructure along the proposed 30-mile corridor. The planning, development and construction of a 30-mile super active transport corridor will provide equitable mobility when paired with existing highways, streets and public transportation networks. This project will also aid in the county’s focus to reduce greenhouse gases via the reduction of vehicle miles traveled and increased alternative options for commuters through its Complete Streets program, which is codified through local ordinance. This program requires DTS to implement solutions enforcing equity for all roadway users, including pedestrians and bicyclist who carry low carbon footprints. Finally, because Oʻahu has limited greenfield development space, future development must focus on sustainable and alternative modes of transport other than the automobile. Regional connectivity for bicyclists between neighborhoods requires a smaller footprint and will be key to overcoming existing infrastructure development challenges.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, EDUCATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES

Early Phase Clinical Trial Unit Construction

  • Project Recipient: University of Hawai‘i, Office of Research Services
  • Recipient Address: 2440 Campus Road, Box 368, Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96822-2234
  • Amount Requested: $7,000,000
  • Project Description: The University of Hawaiʻi (UH) Cancer Center is one of 71 National Cancer Institute-Designated Cancer Centers in the U.S. and the only one in Hawaiʻi and the Pacific. The Center's mission is to reduce the burden of cancer through research, education, patient care and community outreach with an emphasis on the unique ethnic, cultural and environmental characteristics of Hawaiʻi and the Pacific. The UH Cancer Center is seeking Congressional support to complete construction of an Early Phase Clinical Research Center (EPCRC) on its Kaka‘ako campus. This 17,000 square foot outpatient early phase clinical trials clinic—the first of its kind in State of Hawai‘i—would provide Hawai‘i cancer patients who have exhausted traditional treatments with greater access to novel clinical trials across multiple disciplines. The EPCRC would also expand research capabilities at UH and other institutions in the region about the efficacy of novel agents in racially and ethnically diverse populations.
  • Explanation/Justification of Request: A detailed economic impact analysis performed by Emsi—which serves as economic data analytics advisors on labor market data for educational institutions—finds the EPCRC will create 100 sustainable jobs maintained by operational revenues as well as 35 to 40 short term construction related jobs per year for three years. The present combined short- and long-run economic value impact of the overall initiative is $51.1 million. The EPCRC project is estimated to produce annual, sustained contribution to the local economy of $8.4 million thereafter. Members of the Hawai‘i Cancer Consortium, which includes major healthcare providers in the State, have committed to ongoing operational support to ensure sustainability of the EPCRC and its programs. Requested funds would be leveraged in combination with funds received from the National Institutes of Health and the Hawai‘i State Legislature.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

Lunalilo Home Roof Replacement

  • Project Recipient: King Lunalilo Trust and Home
  • Recipient Address: 501 Kekauluohi St. Honolulu, Hawaiʻi 96825
  • Amount Requested: $1,740,550
  • Project Description: Lunalilo Home was founded more than 130 years ago to fulfill the trust of High Chief William Charles Lunalilo, the sixth reigning monarch of Hawai‘i, to provide housing and care to indigent Native Hawaiians, with preference for “kūpuna” or older people. In recent years, Lunalilo Home has expanded its programs and services to reach substantially more disadvantaged kūpuna in their homes and communities and fully realize King Lunalilo’s mission “to honor, tend to, and protect the well-being of elders.” Lunalilo Home is licensed as a Type II Expanded Adult Residential Care Home to accommodate 42 residents. Currently, this nearly 100-year-old facility experiences roof leaks during heavy storms, which has resulted in flooding and structural damage. Requested funds would provide for replacing the 17,010-square-foot tile roof with asphalt shingles and reinforcing existing steel trusses to ensure the facility can withstand harsh weather elements and protect the safety of residents and staff.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: Hawai‘i is facing a “silver tsunami.” According to the State of Hawai‘i Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, Hawai‘i residents age 65 and older will make up nearly 25 percent of the state’s population by 2045. This aging population is increasing the overall demand by Hawai‘i family caregivers to provide their loved ones with a safe, fun and socially engaging environment while receiving expert care. Licensed by the State of Hawai‘i, Lunalilo Home delivers 24/7 personal care assistance to its elderly residents and offers adult day care, respite care and meals-to-go for non-residents living in other O‘ahu communities. Lunalilo Home’s facility serves as a central hub for hosting social and therapeutic activities, preparing healthy, nutritious meals, and supporting training for Certified Nurse Assistants, nurses and other essential staff. A new roof would ensure that Lunalilo Home can provide residents, clients and staff with a safe living and workplace environment.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

Indigenous Data Science Hub at 'Iole

  • Project Recipient: University of Hawai‘i, Office of Research Services
  • Recipient Address: 2440 Campus Road, Box 368, Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96822-2234
  • Amount Requested: $2,980,000
  • Project Description: The University of Hawai‘i Office of Indigenous Innovation seeks to establish an Indigenous Data Science Hub to engage students in experiential learning opportunities and foster collaboration between Indigenous researchers and cultural practitioners in developing community-derived, culturally grounded and globally relevant climate resilience strategies. The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa would administer this Hub in North Kohala on Hawaiʻi Island in the historic ahupuaʻa (traditional land division) of ʻIole, which encompasses 2,400-acres undeveloped land, which would offer its students hands-on opportunities not available on O‘ahu. ‘Iole would serve as a living laboratory for innovative, community-based pilot projects that combine indigenous data science and practices with emerging technologies to address the food, energy and climate challenges facing communities throughout Hawai‘i.
  • Explanation/Justification of Request: The Indigenous Data Science Hub at ‘Iole would provide for novel research and experiential learning not found at other R1 Doctoral Universities in the U.S. Developing and scaling place-based Indigenous data science provides a rare competitive edge to the national data science sector, especially in climate resilience strategies. Congressional support is needed to provide seed funding to build out technical, planning and programmatic infrastructure and other start-up related activities for the Indigenous Data Science Hub at ‘Iole. The Hub is the flagship project for the regional Indigenous Data Science Sector Development Initiative being developed by the Office of Indigenous Innovation under the University of Hawaiʻi System’s Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation. With infrastructure and personnel in place, the University would be better positioned to develop community partnerships and apply for public or private funding needed to sustain the program in the future.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

Kūkalahale Learning Project II

  • Project Recipient: Kula no na Po’e Hawai‘i
  • Recipient Address: 2150 Tantalus Drive, Honolulu, HI 96813
  • Amount Requested: $888,734
  • Project Description: Kula no na Po’e Hawai‘i (KULA) provides a multitude of culturally-tailored programs and activities to the residents of the Hawaiian homestead community of Papakōlea, Kewalo, and Kalawahine (referred to as “Papakōlea”). Papakōlea, which was established in 1934 under the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act, 1921, is the only urban homestead in the State and densely populated with the highest proportion of Native Hawaiians living within a single geographic area. KULA is seeking Congressional support for the Kūkalahale Learning Project II (KLP II), which would offer academic supports and wrap-around services to approximately 300 children and youth during a 12-month period. KLP II builds on the successes of its predecessor, Kūkalahale Learning Project I, which shut down during the COVID-19 pandemic, to improve students’ educational outcomes, school attendance and social and emotional learning through partnerships with nearby public schools and integrating culturally sensitive interventions.
  • Explanation/Justification of Request: Attendance is an important predictor of student success and wellness. Data from spring 2021 suggests that attendance rates dropped significantly during the 2020-21 school year, with high-poverty school districts and schools serving mostly students of color reporting lower rates of student attendance and higher rates of enrollment loss than their counterparts. Afterschool programs have proven to lower dropout rates, close achievement gaps and reduce risky behaviors among low-income and disadvantaged children. The goal of KULA’s KLP II is to address the pandemic-amplified disparities in educational opportunity and achievement and provide for the ongoing needs of at-risk youth through supplemental education services focused on improving student performance, school connectedness and academic resilience. Requested funds would enable KULA to expand and strengthen organizational capacity to administer this program and gain crucial public and private financial support in the future.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

Kūpuna Collective’s Kūpuna Support Navigator Program

  • Project Recipient: Hawaiʻi Public Health Institute
  • Recipient Address: 850 Richards Street, Suite 201, Honolulu, HI 96813
  • Amount Requested: $1,800,000
  • Project Description: The mission of the Kūpuna Collective is to elevate critical issues, mobilize resources and drive solutions that support seniors (“kūpuna”) in Hawai‘i. Consistent with this approach, the Kūpuna Support Navigator Program seeks to develop and train kūpuna support navigators as part of an innovative and sustainable workforce training program that builds the capacity of the Collective’s 190 member organizations. The project would: 1) hire, train, and deploy navigators to integrate home and community-based services for kūpuna; 2) pilot innovative coordinated care models that utilize navigators in the delivery of direct services; and 3) conduct an impact evaluation for refining the program and ensuring scalable and sustainable service delivery models. Navigators would be directed to identify the needs of kūpuna and family caregivers, refer appropriate resources, break down service silos and improve coordination of services (including meals, personal care, home accessibility modifications).
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed several shortcomings in our nation’s health care system, including the need for better integration and coordination of care for kūpuna. Among Hawaii’s kūpuna population, 80 percent have at least one chronic disease, 36 percent have disabilities, 28 percent speak a language other than English, 19 percent live alone and 43 percent struggle to make ends meet. In addition, Hawaii’s kūpuna population continues to grow at a faster pace than anywhere else in the country. Service silos in the long-term care sector continue to hinder providers’ transition to more holistic care models, create barriers to resources for caregivers and reduce the effectiveness and efficiency with which kūpuna receive care. Greater investment is needed to strengthen the long-term care workforce, including on training, recruitment and retention, deployment and use of technology to target resources to at-risk kūpuna and ensure equitable access to care for kūpuna and their families.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

YMCA Youth Wellness Program for Mental Health

  • Project Recipient: YMCA of Honolulu – Kalihi Branch
  • Recipient Address: 1335 Kalihi Street, Honolulu, HI 96819
  • Amount Requested: $270,000
  • Project Description: The YMCA Youth Wellness Program for Mental Health would engage 450 youth, 12 to 18 years of age, in a variety of experiential and therapeutic activities to help participants develop self-awareness, self-esteem, social skills, appropriate coping mechanisms and stress management tools to address their mental health and wellness needs. Program activities would be conducted at YMCA locations and venues where services are easily accessible to the community and take place outside normal school hours. The program curriculum would include nine sessions, with each session lasting approximately 1 to 1.5 hours long for a total of 13 hours maximum per participant. Program staff would conduct pre- and post-program surveys to measure participant outcomes and help them develop strategies for managing their mental health after completing the program. Participants would be referred to clinically appropriate care and resources if determined necessary.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: According to a CDC analysis, in 2021, nearly 40 percent of high school students reported experiencing poor mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic, and 44 percent reported persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness in the last year. Greater investment is needed to reverse these trends and address students’ eroding mental wellbeing. Requested funds would enable the YMCA to build and strengthen organizational capacity and expand outreach services to target mental health and wellness services to youth most at-risk, including Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders who have reported some of the highest rates of negative mental health related to the pandemic. Experiences gained would also help the YMCA acquire critical accreditation as a behavioral health and substance abuse treatment organization necessary for improving operational efficiency and sustaining the program in the future through community partnerships, public or private funding sources or fee-for-service models.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, VETERANS AFFAIRS, AND RELATED AGENCIES

Fort Shafter Water System Upgrade

  • Project Recipient: Department of the Army
  • Recipient Address: Department of the Army, ASA-FM&C (SAFM-BUL), 109 Army Pentagon, 3E331, Washington, DC 20310
  • Amount Requested: $5,000,000
  • Project Description: The current water system at Fort Shafter in Hawai‘i must be replaced to ensure clean drinking water, meet the demands of the base and ensure adequate responses to any fires. The circa 1910 wells at Fort Shafter are increasingly unable to provide drinking water that meets the Army’s health standards. The chloride content has been elevated above Environmental Protection Agency standards since 2017 due to seawater intrusion into the well. This must be rectified to ensure our servicemembers have access to safe drinking water, a basic obligation to those who live on the base. The total cost to complete this project is $33 million, but $5 million is needed to complete the planning and design for this critical project in FY 2023 to keep it on track for full construction funding as soon as possible in succeeding fiscal years. This project is an unfunded priority for the U.S. Army.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: The project is good use of taxpayer funds because our servicemembers must have access to safe drinking water, a basic obligation to those who live on the base. Fort Shafter also needs a more reliable water system to support the critical operations that occur on the base. For example, the base is the home of U.S. Army Pacific, the Army’s lead command in the Indo-Pacific with the responsibility of serving as a component unit of U.S. IndoPacific Command in a conflict. Fort Shafter has seen significant growth due to the consolidation of command elements at U.S. Army Pacific’s new headquarters, and the increased growth in personnel working at the base is placing an increased demand that cannot be met by the existing system. In addition, continued use of the failing water storage and system appurtenances increases the risk that fire response systems will fail during an emergency.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

Tripler Army Medical Center Water System Upgrade

  • Project Recipient: Department of the Army
  • Recipient Address: Department of the Army, ASA-FM&C (SAFM-BUL), 109 Army Pentagon, 3E331, Washington, DC 20310
  • Amount Requested: $4,000,000
  • Project Description: The current water system at Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC) in Hawai‘i must be replaced to ensure basic drinking water, ensure reliable fire suppression systems and support physical security requirements for the military's premier medical facility in the Indo-Pacific. The total cost to complete this project is $27 million, but $5 million is needed to complete the planning and design for this critical project in FY 2023 to keep it on track for full construction funding as soon as possible in succeeding fiscal years. This project is an unfunded priority for the Army. TAMC is the only federal tertiary care hospital in the entire Pacific Basin. It supports 264,000 active duty and retired military personnel, their families and veterans. The referral population includes 171,000 military personnel, family members, veteran beneficiaries and residents from Hawai‘i; forward-deployed forces in more than 40 countries; and the following U.S. territories and affiliated jurisdictions: American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Palau, the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Federated States of Micronesia. It also hosts the Spark M. Matsunaga VA Medical Center, the VA;s flagship facility in the Indo-Pacific that provides a broad range of medical care services for an estimated 50,000 veterans throughout Hawaii and the Pacific Islands. If a new water system is not provided, the health of the veterans and servicemembers who depend on TAMC will be at risk.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: The project is good use of taxpayer funds because if a new water system is not provided, the health of the veterans and servicemembers who depend on TAMC will be at risk. The system is already enduring line breaks and leaks, which will lead to an eventual failure of the water system that would suspend medical services, hinder fire responses and cause other impacts to TMAC’s mission. Additionally, the current water wells are located outside the installation fence line, causing significant security concerns, and the wells are positioned approximately 500 feet below the current storage tanks, which results in extensive pumping utility bills costing two to three times more than the typical design.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter

TRANSPORTATION, HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES

Village of Redemption

  • Project Recipient: The Institute for Human Services
  • Recipient Address: 546 Kaaahi Street, Honolulu, HI 96817
  • Amount Requested: $500,000
  • Project Description: Criminal justice history is common in Oʻahu’s homeless population. The 2017 Touchpoints of Homelessness report noted lifetime incidents of criminal justice system involvement among homeless persons is between 25 and 50%. Despite efforts to prevent repeat offenses in the homeless population, the State of Hawaii’s Department of Public Safety (DPS) has wrestled with the challenges of identifying sufficient services and housing resources to support the re-entry of released offenders into the community. This is due to several reasons, such as a lack of sufficient housing, employment support and access to a clean and sober environment. Funding from the Committee for this project will allow The Institute of Human Services’ Village of Redemption Re-Entry Program to better support the DPS by renovating six two-bedroom, one-bath homes that are available for recently released individuals. These renovations include re-roofing, plumbing repairs and electrical upgrades to meet current permitting standards.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: The Village of Redemption ReEntry Program helps to provide a key resource for released individuals. By providing support services and housing resources, this project and programs like it help to support successful re-entry into the community. This allows for individuals to seek opportunities such as employment support, life coaching and a clean and sober environment. Participating in a community of people striving to reboot their lives innately creates bonds that propel them forward together and put them on a path towards success.
  • Financial Disclosure Certification Letter


Fiscal Year 2022

On March 15, 2022, Congress passed and the President signed into law a $1.5 trillion measure to fund the government for the current fiscal year (FY 2022). The FY 2022 funding bill includes all of $8.2 million I requested for ten specific CPF projects to support underserved areas and foster economic, social and community development where a direct federal investment will be particularly impactful and make a real difference in the lives of so many in our Hawai‘i. As required by my House Appropriation Committee’s CPF rules, here are my recently approved CPF requests for FY 2022:

COMMERCE, JUSTICE, SCIENCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES

Nature-Based Coral Reef Features for Coastal Protection

  • Project Recipient: Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
  • Recipient Address: 46-007 Lilipuna Road, Kāne‘ohe, HI 96744
  • Amount Requested: $200,000
  • Project Description: The project entails the design of a pilot investigation that examines the capacity of innovative blue-green design approaches, in the form of various mixtures, surface textures, and three-dimensional shapes of bio-enhancing materials, to enhance native coral habitat and provide protection to critical coastal infrastructure in Hawai‘i. Combining alternative seawall designs with a method for rapidly growing coral fragments, the Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) at the University of Hawai‘i will explore the potential use of engineered coral reef “living shoreline” approaches for coastal protection and restoration. This project will pilot bio-enhancing concrete materials, textures and shapes (e.g. eco-concrete, composite pumice, or carbon infused concrete) on small sections of seawall at HIMB to promote habitat for native organisms including corals, other invertebrates, and fish, to achieve eco-friendly designs that simultaneously restore reef habitat and protect the shoreline.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: This project would investigate the feasibility of an innovative solution to two major problems in Hawai‘i due to climate change and rising sea levels: coastal erosion and coral reef degradation. By identifying and testing bio-enhancing materials for use in seawalls, this project could enhance coastal resiliency while regrowing coral reef ecosystems. According to a study by the University of California at Santa Cruz, each kilometer of coral reef provides over $10 million in coastal protection each year. Furthermore, this project would be tested at the seawall protecting Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology, a world-class facility for education and research at Moku o Lo‘e (Coconut Island). Over the years, this seawall has been degraded and is in need of repair, presenting an opportunity for this project to test a new, innovative solution while protecting a valuable facility for marine science.
  • Evidence of Community Support:
  • Financial Disclosure Certification:
  • Signed letter certifying no financial interest by Congressman Ed Case or his immediate family.

Waikīkī Marine Life Conservation District Snorkeling Site Restoration

  • Project Recipient: State of Hawai‘i, Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Aquatic Resources
  • Recipient Address: 1151 Punchbowl Street, Room 330, Honolulu, HI 96813
  • Amount Requested: $415,000
  • Project Description: Utilizing the existing Hawaii Coral Restoration Nursery (HCRN) located at the State’s Ānuenue Fisheries Research Center, these fund would be used to produce large living coral modules for outplanting in a concentrated area within the Waikīkī Marine Life Conservation District (MLCD) to enhance shallow-water marine tourism use close to the tourism center of Waikīkī to provide a free, maintained, reef snorkeling experience to help relieve intense visitor pressure on the island’s natural reef habitats and to help re-start the Hawaiian tourism industry after the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Waikīkī MLCD is one of only three completely no-take marine protected areas on the island of O‘ahu. Outplanted modules will be grown at the HCRN using existing, established and proven State of Hawaii protocols and procedures. These plans entail outplanting a minimum combination equivalent to 80 assorted live coral modules (16 inches, but possibly up to 1 yard in size) after a one-year period; these outplanted corals would be maintained at the site over time to provide for an alternative to visitors using our other natural reef areas for recreation. To accomplish this, the State would expand the existing coral growout capability of the HCRN into existing buildings.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: The Waikīkī MLCD is one of only three completely no-take marine protected areas on the island of O‘ahu. It is a significantly degraded MPA in need of coral restoration. The HCRN has shown over the last four to five years that placing larger (i.e. 42-cm or larger), 100%-covered live coral colony modules out onto shallow reefs results in greater survival and production of ecological services and functions than smaller colonies of the same species. This approach, with greater densities of coral, could provide over time greater protection of shoreline infrastructure (the reefs protecting Waikīkī’s shoreline infrastructure have recently been valued at $154.3 million per year for this coastal protection (Honolulu Star-Advertiser; April 19, 2021) and have also been highlighted as being amongst the areas of highest vulnerability because of near-term sea level rise (Honolulu Star-Advertiser; April 5, 2021). Encouraging visitors to enjoy a snorkeling experience on maintained reefs in shallow waters directly adjacent to shore off Waikīkī has the additional benefit to lessen visitor pressure on other less-degraded natural areas around the island that are currently being overused.
  • Evidence of Community Support:
  • Financial Disclosure Certification:
  • Signed letter certifying no financial interest by Congressman Ed Case or his immediate family.

ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT

Honolulu Harbor Modification Feasibility Study

  • Project Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
  • Recipient Address: Programs and Project Management Division, Building 230, Fort Shafter, HI 96858-5440
  • Amount Requested: $1,500,000
  • Project Description: The USACE would conduct a feasibility study to assess the current vulnerabilities of Honolulu Harbor to natural disaster, navigation mishap and sea level rise and to propose opportunities, alternatives or solutions to the vulnerabilities identified. This study will inform the potential authorization of any future USACE projects to modify the infrastructure of Honolulu Harbor.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: Honolulu Harbor is the hub of all maritime activities in the State of Hawai‘i. Significant improvements and modifications must be made in Honolulu Harbor to meet current and future needs, including adapting to climate change and sea level rise, diversifying the economy, responding to maritime industry growth and supporting our nation’s military in the Indo-Pacific region. Honolulu Harbor annually handles over 12 million tons of cargo, including daily essentials such as food and commercial goods that stock our store shelves, as well as less obvious necessities such as aggregate and other construction materials; jet fuel for private, commercial and military aircraft; automobiles; and equipment and machinery for local industry. Honolulu Harbor has major vulnerabilities and is a single point of failure for the logistics behind this critical cargo for Hawai‘i. All heavy shipping traffic that brings in food, supplies and other cargo comes in through a single narrow harbor entrance, where it is offloaded onto barges or trucks and moved to other parts of the state. According to the Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency, at any given point the Hawaiian Islands only have about five to seven days of food on hand. This makes the harbor entrance especially vulnerable to natural disasters or blockages cause by damaged ships, as witnessed this year in the Suez Canal. This has led all parties to agree that it is time to conduct a study to assess what modifications are necessary to address these vulnerabilities, in particular a second entry-exit channel. The Hawai‘i Department of Transportation Harbors Division has reaffirmed its ability to finance the non-federal cost share of a feasibility study of the Honolulu Harbor modification project. It has budgeted the fifty percent local sponsor share of the feasibility study costs in FYs 2021, 2022 and 2023. Additionally, the State of Hawai‘i is committed to actively participating in the execution of the feasibility study and hopes to identify a federally approved plan that can be implemented.
  • Evidence of Community Support:
  • Financial Disclosure Certification:
  • Signed letter certifying no financial interest by Congressman Ed Case or his immediate family.

FINANCIAL SERVICES AND GENERAL GOVERNMENT

Leeward Community Small Business Incubator

  • Project Recipient: The Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture (INPEACE)
  • Recipient Address: 91-1010 Shangrila Street, Suite 306, Kapolei, HI 96707
  • Amount Requested: $500,000
  • Project Description: Hawai‘i has one of the highest percentages of small businesses in our country. With current Small Business Administration partner resources located in central Honolulu, many entrepreneurs on the growing west side of the Island of O‘ahu lack convenient access to technical support and small business assistance resources. INPEACE’s Leeward Community Small Business Incubator Project will provide critical small business assistance to small businesses and entrepreneurs directly in their community so they do not have to transit across the island to obtain key services. With support from the Committee, INPEACE can expand its current business development program capacity, which primarily services the Native Hawaiian and veteran communities, to meet the growing needs of my Leeward community.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: The construction of this Leeward Community Small Business Incubator Lab will bring business resources, training and assistance directly to West O‘ahu. This project will provide business owners serving O‘ahu’s underserved communities with a space and technology to take advantage of technical assistance and training opportunities. It will also allow federal, state and local experts to offer classes in West O‘ahu that will help these business owners be more competitive for grant awards and better understand the regulatory landscape. This project is a long-term investment in West O‘ahu to improve the number and quality of small businesses in O‘ahu’s fastest-growing population center. In addition to helping the local economy and job creation, it can help improve the community more broadly by creating jobs in the community, saving residents hours of commute time, which will allow them to spend more time giving back to the community.
  • Evidence of Community Support:
  • Financial Disclosure Certification:
  • Signed letter certifying no financial interest by Congressman Ed Case or his immediate family.

HOMELAND SECURITY

State Emergency Operations Center in Mililani Tech Park

INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES

Honolulu City Tree Inventory and Management Plan

  • Project Recipient: City and County of Honolulu, Office of Climate Change, Sustainability and Resiliency
  • Recipient Address: 650 S. King Street, Honolulu, HI 96813
  • Amount Requested: $300,000
  • Project Description: These funds will allow Honolulu to develop a complete inventory of its tree assets, which is essential for determining the number of publicly owned trees, planning for new trees and tracking their maintenance needs. Analyzing a complete inventory against social vulnerability and other demographic and environmental data can identify potential disparities in city tree assets across communities and work towards equitable distribution of resources. Explanation of Taxpayer Value: Trees are critical urban infrastructure necessary for the health of Honolulu’s urban community. Often underappreciated, these environmental workhorses provide multiple free environmental services and are essential components of both climate change adaptation and mitigation. According to the City and County of Honolulu, for each dollar spent on tree planting and care, Honolulu’s trees provide $3 in benefits. Recent assessments have determined that O‘ahu has lost nearly 5 percent of its total tree canopy over the study area in just four years. The analysis also showed that the loss is not from vast clearings, but thousands and thousands of pinprick removals across our neighborhoods. Additionally, the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation Division of Urban Forestry receives more requests from the public for removing street trees than for planting. These trends cannot continue if we are to have cool, livable, walkable communities on the Island of O‘ahu. We must invest in and provide steward for our community forests. This project also is consistent with state and local planning efforts. It directly addresses the State Forest Action Plan in the areas of Urban and Community Forestry and Urban Tree Care.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: This project is strongly supported by the community. In 2018, the Honolulu City Council adopted Resolution 18-55 calling for an increase the city’s urban tree canopy to at least 35 percent by 2035. Additionally, community interest has grown in the past three years, with the formulation of non-profits and neighborhood-specific “tree” groups, volunteer citizen foresters helping to collect critical data and the creation of a Community Forestry Section within the city’s Division of Urban Forestry. Additionally, “Maintaining and Enhancing the Community Forestry” was identified as Action 33 of the City’s O’ahu Resilience Strategy, and inventory and asset management were further emphasized in Mayor’s Directive 20-14, City and County of Honolulu Actions to Address Increasing Temperatures and the Urban Tree Canopy.
  • Evidence of Community Support:
  • Financial Disclosure Certification:
  • Signed letter certifying no financial interest by Congressman Ed Case or his immediate family.

LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, EDUCATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES

Blood Bank Hawai‘i Headquarters

  • Project Recipient: Blood Bank of Hawai‘i
  • Recipient Address: 2043 Dillingham Boulevard Honolulu, HI 96819
  • Amount Requested: $2,111,000
  • Project Description: Blood Bank of Hawai‘i (BBH) is planning to construct a new headquarters that will be an integral part of Hawaii’s emergency preparedness plan while also accommodating technological advances, consolidating space and improving operating efficiencies. Plans call for the construction of a 19,000-square-foot, FDA Biosafe Level 2 facility with unrestricted access to collect, process, test, store and distribute blood. This facility will be open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. In addition, features of the new facility ensure required temperature controls, reliable data connectivity, a bio-waste storage area and other technologies to ensure that BBH is able to respond to any new pandemic or emergency, in addition to securing an uninterrupted blood supply. This new facility will serve patients on every island in Hawai‘i.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: Hospitals require a safe and reliable supply of blood for critical patient needs including trauma treatment, neonatal/pediatric ICU services, organ transplants, heart surgeries and oncology centers, among others. Importing blood from the mainland is cost prohibitive and, as a commodity, does not provide the services and expertise for which Hawai‘i hospitals rely on BBH. BBH is the sole blood provider for all of Hawaii’s 18 hospitals and their patients’ blood needs, including those on the neighbor islands (Hawai‘i Island, Maui, Moloka‘i, Lāna‘i and Kaua‘i). BBH’s current operations include donor centers on Dillingham Boulevard in Kalihi, and Young Street in Mo‘ili‘ili, mobile operations and monthly drives on the neighbor islands. When the Young Street location was built in 2012, it was envisioned as a donation center and blood distribution hub for centrally located hospitals. Nearly 10 years later, the Young Street center has grown to be BBH’s primary collection site. However, in the event of a disaster impacting central Honolulu or Honolulu Harbor, it would be strategically advantageous to have a manufacturing plant a greater distance away from downtown Honolulu. In addition, our current facility does not allow for growth and the critical need to integrate new technologies into our operations. As a result, after a thorough assessment process, BBH recently purchased a property in the growing community of West O‘ahu as a new permanent home for its statewide headquarters, in support of its donor center in Mo‘ili‘ili, mobile operations and neighbor island drives. In looking to the future, the population growth is going to shift to West O‘ahu. Healthcare facilities have been built or expanded over the last five years to serve this growth. A blood distribution and permanent donation center in West O‘ahu would serve these facilities while expanding BBH’s donor base including those with rare blood types. This new facility will ensure that BBH can continue to be an integral partner in addressing ever-emerging health threats to our community. BBH’s program to collect COVID Convalescent Plasma (CCP), a blood product from recovered patients that can help hospitalized patients recover, demonstrated significant benefits for Hawaii’s patients and the hospitals treating them. To date, over 3,000 doses have been collected from 200 donors, 1,859 doses transfused to local patients and several hundred doses remain in inventory.
  • Evidence of Community Support:
  • Financial Disclosure Certification:
  • Signed letter certifying no financial interest by Congressman Ed Case or his immediate family.

Hale Lauele Indigenous Health and Education Center

  • Project Recipient: Kōkua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Planning Services
  • Recipient Address: 2239 N. School Street, Honolulu, HI 96819
  • Amount Requested: $1,057,963
  • Project Description: The proposed project would provide for the construction of a new 7,500 sq. ft. facility, Hale Lauele, to support and promote land-based, indigenous-focused health and education. The Center would be located on a 10-acre nature preserve cared for by Kōkua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Planning Services (KKV), Hoʻoulu ʻAina. Hale Lauele will include curriculum and training for community health workers and clinical staff to integrate indigenous knowledge and practices (such as lā’au lapa’au, hoʻoponopono, and lomilomi) into conventional clinical programs at health centers, hospitals and other health care settings.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: The Hale Lauele Center would be a unique structure filling a particular need for KKV and for the State of Hawaii since no other Federally-Qualified Health Center of the 1400 nationwide cares for a large nature preserve or offers comparable types of health programming. With almost fifty years' experience serving the low income Asian, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander community of Kalihi in Honolulu, KKV takes a holistic approach to providing primary care services that supports the needs of patients who are among the most vulnerable. Our strategies at Hale Lauele would address social determinants of health and the root causes of significant health disparities which were underscored by high infection and death rates from COVID-19. Our methodology has long-term benefits that include significant reductions in emergency and urgent care services. KKV has developed an effective community health curriculum and training protocol for medical providers, community health workers, and clinical staff. Our program integrates Indigenous practices such as lāʻau lapaʻau, hoʻoponopono, and lomilomi that have proven to be meaningful and beneficial to our patients. Hale Lauele will also support a practice-based program where patients can receive healing from practitioners.
  • Evidence of Community Support:
  • Financial Disclosure Certification:
  • Signed letter certifying no financial interest by Congressman Ed Case or his immediate family.

University of Hawaiʻi Rural Health Research Center

  • Project Recipient: University of Hawaiʻi System, Office of Strategic Health Initiatives
  • Recipient Address: 2425 Campus Road, Sinclair 10, Honolulu, HI 96822
  • Amount Requested: $991,605
  • Project Description: The University of Hawaiʻi (UH) System seeks to establish a Rural Health Research Center (RHRC) focused on rural health workforce policy and health equity in its Office of Strategic Health Initiatives to conduct high-quality and policy-relevant research and develop policy recommendations to improve rural health care in Hawaiʻi. This project is part of the existing UHealthy Hawaiʻi initiative and in partnership with key local rural health stakeholders.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: The need for a Rural Health Research Center at the University of Hawai‘i (UH), supported by key rural health stakeholders in Hawai‘i, has perhaps never been so acute. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Hawaii’s rural areas already faced significant health provider shortages; challenges with travel to O‘ahu for specialist care; limited access to certain health services (i.e., dialysis); and significant health disparities, particularly among Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (NHPI) populations. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated many of the health provider shortages in rural areas and many community, state, and federal stakeholders have expressed the need for further data and policy to improve rural health care in Hawaiʻi. A UH Rural Health Research Center, focused on rural health workforce policy and health equity in partnership with key rural health stakeholders, would be an excellent use of taxpayer funds because it would help to drive policy recommendations to improve quality of life and health outcomes for rural residents; decrease health disparities and pursue health equity across the state of Hawai‘i; potentially decrease health care costs; and make Hawai‘i a healthier place to live, especially for the most vulnerable. The proposed new Rural Health Research Center at UH would provide a critical new hub for advancing policy and evidence-based research related to rural health and—specifically in Hawai‘i—rural health workforce policy and health equity. The Center is consistent with the UHealthy Hawai‘i initiative, which aims to leverage the UH System to improve health and health care in Hawai‘i and the Pacific through four primary areas of focus: ensuring a robust statewide health workforce; discovering and innovating to improve and extend lives; promoting healthier families and communities; and advancing health in all policies. UHealthy Hawai‘i has 35 community partners across the state of Hawaiʻi, including from the state government, health systems, primary care providers, insurers, health associations and advocacy groups, business community, and more.
  • Evidence of Community Support:
  • Financial Disclosure Certification:
  • Signed letter certifying no financial interest by Congressman Ed Case or his immediate family.

Workforce Resilience Initiative

  • Project Recipient: State of Hawai‘i Workforce Development Council
  • Recipient Address: 830 Punchbowl Street, Room 417, Honolulu, HI 96813
  • Amount Requested: $990,000
  • Project Description: In partnership with the State Libraries and Hawai‘i Literacy, the initiative will provide digital literacy training via in-person computer classes and access to online learning resources. Participants meet for one three-hour class and learn the basic computer skills necessary to continue learning intermediate and more advanced concepts online. The goal of the program is to produce a digitally-ready statewide workforce by reaching up to 8,000 people with basic computer skills training and providing access to more advanced workforce skills through online learning resources to over 2,500 people. This will be accomplished over 12 months through upskilling and reskilling training for Hawaii’s workforce in the areas of 1) digital literacy and computer skills, and 2) collaborative problem-solving skills in a technology-rich environment.
  • Explanation of Taxpayer Value: Throughout the state, and based on the best data available, there are at least 220,000 (16%) Hawai‘i residents without the digital literacy skills to access and perform any of the basic activities available online. These activities include telehealth, banking, shopping, scheduling vaccinations, filing for unemployment, and staying in contact with family and friends. Research from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in 2016 suggests that the number of people struggling with digital skills in the United States may be as high as 65 percent of the population 16-65 years old. Hawai‘i does not currently have digital literacy data available at the state level for the general population or the workforce. However, even if only 20 percent of the workforce is at the lowest levels of digital skills that is still over 100,000 people in Hawaii’s workforce without the digital literacy necessary to be competitive in a world-wide market. The UK conducted an economic impact assessment in 2017 of the lack of digital literacy. Their conclusion stated: “Digital skills are becoming increasingly essential for getting access to a range of products and services. However, there is a digital divide where up to 12.6 million of the adult UK population lack basic digital skills. An estimated 5.8 million people have never used the internet at all. This digital skills gap is costing the UK economy an estimated £63 billion a year in lost additional GDP.” A proactive, deliberate effort to provide basic digital skills is a necessity for not just the individual’s economic well-being in Hawai‘i but also for the state as a whole.
  • Evidence of Community Support:
  • Financial Disclosure Certification:
  • Signed letter certifying no financial interest by Congressman Ed Case or his immediate family.


Fiscal Year 2023 National Defense Authorization Act Community Funded Project Funding Requests

Fort Shafter Water System Upgrade

Project Description: Funding for this project would be used to support the planning and design work to replace the Army's failing water system at Fort Shafter in Hawai‘i. It must be replaced to provide basic drinking water, ensure reliable fire suppression systems and bring the base into compliance with Environmental Protection Agency standards.

Financial Disclosure: HERE

Tripler Army Medical Center Water System Upgrade

Project Description: Funding for this project would be used to support the planning and design work to replace the Army's failing water system at Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawai‘i. It must be replaced to provide basic drinking water, ensure reliable fire suppression systems and support physical security requirements for the military's premier medical facility in the Indo-Pacific.

Financial Disclosure: HERE